For most Australian farmers today, the sight of hail brings about worry especially during the warmer months when thunderstorms are prevalent, yet majority of them make no effort to include hail in their farm risk management plans.

Farmers in Australia are no longer excited at the sight of an impending storm, and it’s easy to tell why. These days, severe weather has been causing a lot of damage to farms and crop. Regardless of where farmers are, most of them have had an encounter with the effects of bad weather—albeit differently.

That’s why it’s important for Australian farmers to prepare in advance for a hailstorm by doing all they have to do and if possible even take a crop insurance cover (read more about crop insurance towards the end of this post).

I’m so certain that by now you’ve seen numerous hailstorms and watched in amazement the sight of ice hammering down during Australia’s smoldering summer.

For most Australian farmers today, the sight of hail brings about worry especially during the warmer months when thunderstorms are prevalent, yet majority of them make no effort to include hail in their farm risk management plans.

Like any other weather event, hailstorms are unpredictable and can happen at any time, but that does not mean that you can’t prepare prior. We’ll tell you how.

When you see looming storm clouds, that could just mean hail is fast approaching.

Why Does Hail Occur?

This is a common question at Storm Assist

So what exactly is it?

Well, hailstones refer to the ice crystals created when storm updraughts move water way beyond the freezing level within the clouds.

Stones form and fall, creating a new layer of icy water every time, before it becomes too heavy and eventually falls to the ground as hailstones.

Naturally, hailstones fall easily and have no time to melt before reaching the ground. With this kind of velocity, it’s expected that hail of all kinds of sizes would cause damage.

Keep in mind that hailstones can damage crops in several ways. A single hailstorm can:

  • Uproot crops
  • Expose roots
  • Defoliate plants
  • Decrease yields
  • Cause spots & discolouration of plants

Additionally, whenever the roots or leaves of a plant are damaged, they become exposed to disease and that’s why it’s important to use hoops, row covers or greenhouse tunnels to cover your crops when hail is forecast.

Click here to read the full article: Step By Step: How Can You Prepare Your Farm For A Hailstorm!

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