NSW and Queensland are set to experience temps of up to 16 degrees and 14 degrees respectively on Monday and a low to severe heatwave expected to hit the eastern states.  

New South Wales and Queensland are smoldering through the day as temperatures rise to 16 degrees Celsius above average, with one of the cities recording its hottest November day since 2015 as well as strong winds.

NSW and Queensland are set to experience temps of up to 16 degrees and 14 degrees respectively on Monday and a low to severe heatwave expected to hit the eastern states.

Most of the Sunshine State experience increased fire danger conditions, as the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) issued a warning for fires in the state’s western areas.

According to Dean Narramore of the BOM, “Sydney will be a hot one today, particularly the western suburbs where Penrith will get to 41, which will be their warmest November day since 2015.”

“Sydney itself may be protected by sea breezes but will still see temperatures into the 20s as a subtle bluster will bring a cool change in the afternoon.”

Mr Narramore added that Queensland was forecast to witness a heatwave on Monday particularly in the state’s inland areas.

Queensland braces for a heatwave, with inland temperatures expected to punch through the 40 mark this weekend, and no relief to the stifling conditions expected until Wednesday.

“Western suburbs of Brisbane will see temperatures in the mid-30s, while Ipswich could hit 36,” he said.

“It will be similar tomorrow and then temperatures will drop into the high 20s and low 30s, while most of inland Queensland is going to have a hot week with temperatures into the high 30s to low 40s.”

A fire weather warning issued by the BOM is in place for southwest Queensland including Warrego, Maranoa and Longreach which are forecast to hit peak temperatures of 42 degrees Celsius.

“The trough is expected to move across the district from the southwest during the day, reaching Cunnamulla in the afternoon, then Charleville and St George in the evening,” the warning states.

“East of the trough, conditions will be hot with fresh, gusty north to northwesterly winds. West of the trough, strong and gusty southwesterly winds are expected.”

For now, highly destructive winds are set to strike various parts of South Australia with gusts of speeds up to 110km/h expected to sweep across many parts of NSW and Victoria.

Melbourne will record a peak of 23 degrees Celsius, Canberra 28, Perth 24, Hobart 22 and Adelaide 21.

The information contained in this article is of a general nature only. It does not take your specific needs, objectives or circumstances into consideration, and is not financial advice, legal advice or otherwise a recommendation to purchase any financial product or insurance policy. You should seek your own independent financial advice from a qualified financial and insurance adviser before making any financial decisions, and seek your own independent legal advice from a qualified solicitor before making any decisions of a legal nature.

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