Some of the animals have made a name for themselves, with employees at the national park showcasing a sassy group of native burrowing frogs that became too active at the Cultural Centre building that they set off the security alarms.

All roads are heading to Uluru as tourists flock the region to catch a glimpse of the breathtaking waterfalls gushing at the sacred rock following the recent wild weather experienced across Australia.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park employees shared on social media a collection of pictures of the “unique and extraordinary weather event”.

According to their post, the rain gauge in Uluru recorded more than 46mm over the weekend.

“Rainwater on the rock’s surface causes it to change colour,” the post stated.

“From dark burgundy to shining silver and even black, every side of Uluru takes a different shade, making this spectacle a photographer’s delight.

“Following the rain, desert plants bloom and many animals emerge to mate and feed.”

Some of the animals have made a name for themselves, with employees at the national park showcasing a sassy group of native burrowing frogs that became too active at the Cultural Centre building that they set off the security alarms.

Uluru records around 300mm of rainfall annually on average, meaning the park received a sixth of its annual total rainfall within two days.

The heavy rainfall recently received in the region has brought about smaller waterfalls at Uluru several times during this last summer, but the heavy downpour over the weekend caused stronger waterfalls.

The neighbouring Alice Springs has received “above average” rain since the beginning of the year, with approximately 50mm being received in just 24 hours to Monday morning.

The Bureau of Meteorology’s radar has predicted little to no rainfall within the Kata Tjuta region for the remaining part of the week.

Parks Australia notes that witnessing Uluru and its magnificent waterfalls after a heavy deluge is a lifetime experience that only a few get to revel, with the renowned red and golden sunrise and sunset sights common throughout the year.

Uluru has been a no-go-zone for climbers since October 2019 following decades of fierce campaigns by traditional owners. Currently there are hefty penalties for people caught trying to or scaling the rock.

Nevertheless, the rock remains a huge destination for both domestic and international tourists, though the strict COVID-19 restrictions in place have limited the number of visitors to the sacred site for the last 12 months.

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